Translating cryobiology principles into trans-disciplinary storage guidelines for biorepositories and biobanks: A concept paper

Erica E. Benson*, Fotini Betsou, Barry J. Fuller, Keith Harding, Olga Kofanova

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low temperatures are used routinely to preserve diverse biospecimens, genetic resources and nonviable or viable biosamples for medical and clinical research in hospital-based biobanks and nonmedical biorepositories, such as genebanks and culture, scientific, museum, and environmental collections. However, the basic knowledge underpinning preservation can sometimes be overlooked by practitioners who are unfamiliar with fundamental cryobiological principles which are more usually described in research literature rather than in quality and risk management documents. Whilst procedures vary, low temperature storage is a common requirement and reaching consensus as to how best it is applied could facilitate the entire biopreservation sector. This may be achieved by encouraging an understanding of cryoprotection theory and emphasizing the criticality of thermal events (glass transitions, ice nucleation, thawing) for sample integrity, functionality and stability. The objective of this paper is to inspire diverse biopreservation sectors to communicate more clearly about low temperature storage and, raise awareness of the importance of cryobiology principles to field newcomers and biopreservation practitioners, by considering how the principles may be translated into evidence-based guidelines for biobank and biorepository operations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-312
Number of pages36
JournalCryo-Letters
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Biobank
  • Biopreservation
  • Biorepository
  • Cryobiology
  • Storage guidelines

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