The Absence of Gastrointestinal Redox Dyshomeostasis in the Brain-First Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease Induced by Bilateral Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine

Jan Homolak*, Mihovil Joja, Gracia Grabaric, Emiliano Schiatti, Davor Virag, Ana Babic Perhoc, Ana Knezovic, Jelena Osmanovic Barilar, Melita Salkovic-Petrisic

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The gut-brain axis plays an important role in Parkinson’s disease (PD) by acting as a route for vagal propagation of aggregated α-synuclein in the gut-first endophenotype and as a mediator of gastrointestinal dyshomeostasis via the nigro-vagal pathway in the brain-first endophenotype of the disease. One important mechanism by which the gut-brain axis may promote PD is by regulating gastrointestinal redox homeostasis as overwhelming evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a key role in the etiopathogenesis and progression of PD and the gastrointestinal tract maintains redox homeostasis of the organism by acting as a critical barrier to environmental and microbiological electrophilic challenges. The present aim was to utilize the bilateral intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) brain-first PD model to study the effects of isolated central pathology on redox homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were either not treated (intact controls; CTR) or treated bilaterally intrastriatally with vehicle (CIS) or 6-OHDA (6-OHDA). Motor deficits were assessed with the rotarod performance test, and the duodenum, ileum, and colon were dissected for biochemical analyses 12 weeks after the treatment. Lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, low-molecular-weight thiols, and protein sulfhydryls, the activity of total and Mn/Fe superoxide dismutases, and total and azide-insensitive catalase/peroxidase were measured. Both univariate and multivariate models analyzing redox biomarkers indicate that significant disturbances in gastrointestinal redox balance are not present. The findings demonstrate that motor impairment observed in the brain-first 6-OHDA model of PD can occur without concurrent redox imbalances in the gastrointestinal system.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular Neurobiology
Early online date10 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Gastrointestinal
  • Gut-brain axis
  • Oxidative stress
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Redox homeostasis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Absence of Gastrointestinal Redox Dyshomeostasis in the Brain-First Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease Induced by Bilateral Intrastriatal 6-Hydroxydopamine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this