Separate foliar sodium selenate and zinc oxide application enhances Se but not Zn accumulation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds

Maksymilian Malka, Gijs Du Laing, Jun Li, Torsten Bohn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Up to 15% and 17% of the world population is selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) deficient, respectively. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important staple legume with a high potential for Se and Zn biofortification in seeds. A 2-year pot experiment investigated two pea varieties (Ambassador and Premium) following foliar-applied sodium selenate (0/50/100 g of Se/ha) and zinc oxide (0/375/750 g of Zn/ha) at the flowering stage. Selenate and zinc oxide had minimal overall effects on growth parameters. Zinc oxide did not improve Zn accumulation in both seed varieties, while selenate improved Se accumulation in both seed varieties dose-dependently. Premium accumulated greater amounts of Se in seeds than Ambassador (p < 0.001). Selenium concentrations were highest in seeds of Premium treated with 100 g of Se/ha [7.84 mg/kg DW vs. the control (0.16 mg/kg DW), p < 0.001]. The predominant Se species in Se-enriched seeds was selenomethionine (40%–76% of total Se). Furthermore, a significant (p < 0.01) positive correlation was found between Zn and S concentrations in Ambassador (r2 = 0.446) and Premium (r2 = 0.498) seeds, but not between Se and S. Consuming as little as 55 g/day of pea biofortified by 50 g of Se/ha would cover 100% of the adult RDA (55 µg) for Se. Findings are important for improving foliar biofortification of pea with Se and Zn.

Original languageEnglish
Article number968324
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • legume biofortification,selenate,Zinc Oxide,Mineral deficiency,nutrition,Food security,HPLC-ICP/MS

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