Repetitive DNA sequences located in the central region of the human mdr1 (multidrug resistance) gene may account for a gene fusion event during its evolution

Marc Pauly*, Isabelle Kayser, Martine Schmitz, Fernand Ries, François Hentges, Mario Dicato

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mdr1 gene, first member of the human multidrug-resistance gene family, is a major gene involved in cellular resistance to several drugs used in anticancer chemotherapy. Its product, the drug-excreting P-glycoprotein, shows a bipartite structure formed by two similar adjacent halves. According to one hypothesis, the fusion of two related ancestral genes during evolution could have resulted in this structure. The DNA sequence analysis of the introns located in the region connecting the two halves of the human mdr1 gene revealed a highly conserved poly(CA) · poly (TG) sequence in intron 15 and repeated sequences of the Alu family in introns 14 and 17. These repeated sequences most likely represent “molecular fossils” of ancient DNA elements which were involved in such a recombination event.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)974-978
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Molecular Evolution
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alu repeat
  • Conservation
  • DNA sequence
  • Gene evolution
  • Gene fusion
  • Human mdr1 gene
  • Intron
  • Multidrug resistance
  • P-glycoprotein
  • poly(CA) · poly(TG) microsatellite

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