Longitudinal association of antidepressant medication use with metabolic syndrome: Results of a 9-year follow-up of the D.E.S.I.R. cohort study

Marine Azevedo Da Silva*, Beverley Balkau, Ronan Roussel, Jean Tichet, Frédéric Fumeron, Guy Fagherazzi, Hermann Nabi, D.E.S.I.R. study group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine longitudinal associations between antidepressant medication use and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods 5014 participants (49.8% were men) from the D.E.S.I.R. cohort study, aged 30–65 years at baseline in 1994–1996, were followed over 9 years at 3-yearly intervals (1997–1999, 2000–2002, and 2003–2005). Antidepressant use and MetS, defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria (NCEP-ATP III) and the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) criteria, were assessed concurrently at four medical examinations. Results In fully-adjusted longitudinal logistic regression analyses based on generalized estimating equations, antidepressant users had a 9% (p = 0.011) and a 6% (p = 0.036) greater annual increase in the odds of having the MetS defined by NCEP-ATP III and AHA/NHLBI criteria respectively. Sex-specific analyses showed that this association was confined to men only. When the different types of antidepressant were considered, men who used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), imipramine type antidepressants or “other” antidepressants had a 52% (p = 0.028), 31% (p = 0.011), and 16% (p = 0.016) greater annual increase in the odds of having the MetS over time compared to non-users, respectively. These associations depended on the definition of the MetS. Conclusions Our longitudinal data showed that antidepressant use was associated with an increased odds of having the MetS in men but not in women and this was mainly for SSRIs, imipramine type and “other” antidepressants. People on antidepressants may need to be checked regularly for the elements of the metabolic syndrome treatable by change in diet, physical activity and/or by medication therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-45
Number of pages12
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume74
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AHA/NHLBI
  • Antidepressant
  • Cohort study
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • NCEP-ATP III
  • Prospective study

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