In vitro susceptibilities and biotypes of Candida albicans isolates from the oral cavities of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

H. C. Korting, M. Ollert, A. Georgii, M. Froschl

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Abstract

Candida albicans strains were isolated from the oral cavities of 62 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients at different stages of HIV infection. Only patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex or full-blown AIDS showed typical clinical symptoms for oral candidiasis. In general, the microbiological recovery of Candida strains from the oral cavity increased with more advanced stages of HIV infection. The antifungal activity of ketoconazole, itraconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B, and flucytosine against all 62 strains was evaluated by means of a photometer-read broth microdilution method for determination of the 30% inhibitory concentrations of the drugs. The 95% ranges of 30% inhibitory concentrations were as follows: ≤0.063 to 32 μg/ml for ketoconazole, ≤0.063 to 8 μg/ml for itraconazole, 0.5 to 4 μg/ml for nystatin, ≤0.063 to 4 μg/ml for amphotericin B, and ≤0.063 to 8 μg/ml for flucytosine. Two strains were resistant to flucytosine, one was resistant to ketoconazole, and three were resistant to itraconazole. Isolates from patients with full-blown AIDS showed significantly less susceptibility to itraconazole, amphotericin B, and flucytosine. Strains were biotyped by using the API 20C carbohydrate assimilation system. The major biotype accounted for 63.9% of the isolates. At repeated evaluation, a change in biotype pattern was seen in 27.3%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2626-2631
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume26
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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