Examining the prevalence and correlates of multimorbidity among community-dwelling older adults: cross-sectional evidence from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) first-follow-up data

James H B Im, Rebecca Rodrigues, Kelly K Anderson, Piotr Wilk, Saverio Stranges, Kathryn Nicholson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: multimorbidity has become an increasingly important issue for many populations around the world, including Canada. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of multimorbidity at first follow-up and to identify factors associated with multimorbidity using data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA).

METHODS: this study included 27,701 community-dwelling participants in the first follow-up of the CLSA. Multimorbidity was operationalised using two definitions (Public Health and Primary Care), as well as the cut-points of two or more chronic conditions (MM2+) and three or more chronic conditions (MM3+). The prevalence of multimorbidity was calculated at first follow-up and multivariable regression models were used to identify correlates of multimorbidity occurrence.

RESULTS: the prevalence of multimorbidity at first follow-up was 32.3% among males and 39.3% among females when using the MM2+ Public Health definition, whereas the prevalence was 67.2% among males and 75.8% among females when using the MM2+ Primary Care definition. Older age, lower alcohol consumption, lower physical activity levels, dissatisfaction with sleep quality, dissatisfaction with life and experiencing social limitations due to health conditions were significantly associated with increased odds of multimorbidity for both males and females, regardless of the definition of multimorbidity used.

CONCLUSION: various sociodemographic, behavioural and psychosocial factors are associated with multimorbidity. Future research should continue to examine how the prevalence of multimorbidity changes with time and how these changes may be related to specific risk factors. This future research should be supplemented with studies examining the longitudinal impacts of multimorbidity over time.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2022

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