Clinical and biological risk factors associated with inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

Mohammed S. Ellulu, Hanen Samouda*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and related metabolic dysregulation, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several non modifiable (i.e. genetic predisposition) and modifiable (i.e. sedentary lifestyle, energy-dense food) risk factors were suggested to explain the mechanisms involved in the development of inflammation, but are difficult to assess in clinical routine. The present study aimed to identify easy to asses clinical and biological risk factors associated with inflammation in patients with T2DM. Methods: One hundred nine patients (51 men, 58 women), 28–60 years old, from seven primary healthcare centers in Gaza City, Palestine, took part to the cross-sectional study (November 2013–May 2014). Study participants had T2DM with no history of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, medication and/or any health condition that might affect the inflammatory markers, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Inflammation was defined for IL-6 ≥ 2 pg/mL and CRP ≥ 6 mg/L. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify the relationship between inflammation and clinical and biological risk factors. Results: After adjustment for age and gender, inflammation seems to increase with increased body mass index (BMI) (OR: 1.427 [1.055–1.931]), increased fasting blood glucose (OR: 1.029 [1.007–1.052]) and decreased adiponectin values (OR: 0.571 [0.361–0.903]). There were also significant relationships between inflammation and BMI (OR: 1.432 [1.042–1.968]), fasting blood glucose (OR: 1.029 [1.006–1.052]) and adiponectin (OR: 0.569 [0.359–0.902]), after adjustment for smoking habits and physical activity. Conclusion: Managing obesity and associated complications (i.e. hyperglycemia, high adiponectin levels) might help decreasing inflammation in individuals with T2DM.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
Pages (from-to)16
JournalBMC Endocrine Disorders
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Body mass index
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diabetes
  • Inflammation
  • Obesity

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