Cancer treatment-related decision-making among culturally and linguistically diverse older adults with cancer: A scoping review by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group

Bonnie Leung*, Sophie Pilleron, Esther Bastiaannet, Lorinda A. Coombs, Rana Jin, Kavita Kantilal, Kumud Kantilal, Cindy Kenis, Francis Kobekyaa, Ludmila Kosmari, Jessica L. Krok-Schoen, Juan Li, Colm Mac Eochagain, Lorelei Newton, Tracy Ruegg, Petra Stolz-Baskett, Yue Zhao, Cara Bradley, Martine Puts, Kristen R. Haase

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Countries with large economies are observing a growing number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) older adults, many of whom will be affected by cancer. Little is known about the experiences and factors that influence cancer treatment decision-making in this population. The purposes of this scoping review are: (1) to summarize the published literature on cancer treatment-related decision-making with this population; and (2) to identify potential differences in how cancer treatment decisions are made compared to non-CALD older adults with cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley and Levac methods, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Scoping Review Guidelines. We conducted a comprehensive multidatabase search, screening 1,139 titles/abstracts. Following data abstraction, we analyzed the data using tabular and narrative summary. Results: We extracted data from six studies that met the inclusion criteria: four quantitative and two qualitative; five from the United States and one from Canada. Three themes were identified: (1) barriers to decision-making, (2) the influence of family and friends on decisionmaking, and (3) differences in uptake and types of treatment received between CALD and non-CALD older adults. Discussion: This comprehensive review of treatment decision-making among CALD older adults with cancer highlights the paucity of research in this area. The findings are limited to North American populations and may not represent experiences in other regions of the world. Future research should focus on studying their treatment-related decision-making experiences to improve the quality of care for this vulnerable population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101607
JournalJournal of Geriatric Oncology
Volume14
Issue number8
Early online date24 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2023

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cancer
  • cancer treatment
  • Decision-making
  • Ethnocultural diversity
  • Geriatrics
  • Linguistic diversity
  • Migrants
  • Older adults
  • Race

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