Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm

Feng Jiao Peng, Guang Guo Ying*, Chang Gui Pan, Henriette Selck, Daniel Salvito, Paul J. Van Den Brink

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms. After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90% of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8390-8398
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Science & Technology
Volume52
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

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