Associations Between Wearable-Specific Indicators of Physical Activity Behaviour and Insulin Sensitivity and Glycated Haemoglobin in the General Population: Results from the ORISCAV-LUX 2 Study

Anne Backes*, Gloria A. Aguayo, Paul J. Collings, Douae El Fatouhi, Guy Fagherazzi, Laurent Malisoux, Ala’a Alkerwi, Stephanie Noppe, Charles Delagardelle, Jean Beissel, Anna Chioti, Saverio Stranges, Jean Claude Schmit, Marie Lise Lair, Marylène D’Incau, Jessica Pastore, Gwenaëlle Le Coroller, Gloria A. Aguayo, Brice Appenzeller, Sophie CouffignalManon Gantenbein, Yvan Devaux, Michel Vaillant, Laetitia Huiart, Dritan Bejko, Torsten Bohn, Hanen Samouda, Magali Perquin, Maria Ruiz, Isabelle Ernens, Oriscav-Lux Study Group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Parameters derived from an acceleration signal, such as the time accumulated in sedentary behaviour or moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), may not be sufficient to describe physical activity (PA) which is a complex behaviour. Incorporating more advanced wearable-specific indicators of PA behaviour (WIPAB) may be useful when characterising PA profiles and investigating associations with health. We investigated the associations of novel objective measures of PA behaviour with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin sensitivity (Quicki index). Methods: This observational study included 1026 adults (55% women) aged 18-79y who were recruited from the general population in Luxembourg. Participants provided ≥ 4 valid days of triaxial accelerometry data which was used to derive WIPAB variables related to the activity intensity, accumulation pattern and the temporal correlation and regularity of the acceleration time series. Results: Adjusted general linear models showed that more time spent in MVPA and a higher average acceleration were both associated with a higher insulin sensitivity. More time accumulated in sedentary behaviour was associated with lower insulin sensitivity. With regard to WIPAB variables, parameters that were indicative of higher PA intensity, including a shallower intensity gradient and higher average accelerations registered during the most active 8 h and 15 min of the day, were associated with higher insulin sensitivity. Results for the power law exponent alpha, and the proportion of daily time accumulated in sedentary bouts > 60 min, indicated that activity which was characterised by long sedentary bouts was associated with lower insulin sensitivity. A greater proportion of time spent in MVPA bouts > 10 min was associated with higher insulin sensitivity. A higher scaling exponent alpha at small time scales (< 90 min), which shows greater correlation in the acceleration time series over short durations, was associated with higher insulin sensitivity. When measured over the entirety of the time series, metrics that reflected a more complex, irregular and unpredictable activity profile, such as the sample entropy, were associated with lower HbA1c levels and higher insulin sensitivity. Conclusion: Our investigation of novel WIPAB variables shows that parameters related to activity intensity, accumulation pattern, temporal correlation and regularity are associated with insulin sensitivity in an adult general population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number146
JournalSports Medicine - Open
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • Glycaemic control
  • Physical activity pattern
  • Wearable sensors

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