An outbreak of African Swine Fever in Nigeria: Virus isolation and molecular characterization of the VP72 gene of a first isolate from West Africa

Solomon O. Odemuyiwa, Isaac A. Adebayo, Wim Ammerlaan, Adebowale T.P. Ajuwape, Olugbenga O. Alaka, Oluwaseyi I. Oyedele, Kamil O. Soyelu, David O. Olaleye, Ebenezer B. Otesile, Claude P. Muller

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The isolation of 98/ASF/NG, a strain of African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) associated with a 1998 epizootic in Nigeria, is reported. This first isolate of the virus from West Africa was identified through a successful polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of a 280 base pair (bp) fragment of the Major Capsid Protein (VP72) gene. Further amplification and sequence analysis of a 1.9 kilobase pair (kbp) fragment encompassing the complete VP72 gene showed that the isolate has a 92.2%, 92.4%, and 97.2% homology with previously sequenced Ugandan, Dominican Republican and Spanish isolates respectively. Of the 50 nucleotide changes observed in this highly conserved gene, 45 were found to result in 40 amino acid changes clustered around the central region (position 426 to 516) of the VP72 protein while changes at the remaining 5 positions were silent. These changes also led to the loss of two out of the seven potential N-glycosylation sites which are in this gene conserved among all isolates. The possible epizootiological implications of such mutations in a highly conserved gene of a DNA virus is discussed in relation to this outbreak.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)139-142
    Number of pages4
    JournalVirus Genes
    Volume20
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Keywords

    • 98/ASF/NG
    • ASE
    • Glycosylation site loss
    • Mutations
    • Nigeria
    • VP72 gene

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'An outbreak of African Swine Fever in Nigeria: Virus isolation and molecular characterization of the VP72 gene of a first isolate from West Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this