A Novel Immunofluorescent Computed Tomography (ICT) Method to Localise and Quantify Multiple Antigens in Large Tissue Volumes at High Resolution

Geraint J. Parfitt, Yilu Xie, Korey M. Reid, Xavier Dervillez, Donald J. Brown, James V. Jester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current immunofluorescence protocols are limited as they do not provide reliable antibody staining within large tissue volumes (mm3) and cannot localise and quantify multiple antigens or cell populations in the same tissue at high resolution. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach to three-dimensionally visualise large tissue volumes (mm3) at high resolution (<1 μm) and with multiple antigen labelling, for volumetric and quantitative analysis. This is made possible through computer reconstruction of serial sectioned and sequentially immunostained butyl-methyl methacrylate (BMMA) embedded tissue. Using this novel immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT) approach, we have three-dimensionally reconstructed part of the murine lower eyelid that contains the meibomian gland and localised cell nuclei (DAPI), Ki67 and cytokeratin 1 (CK1), as well as performing non-linear optical (NLO) microscopy imaging of collagen, to assess cell density, cell proliferation, gland keratinisation and gland volume respectively. Antigenicity was maintained after four iterative stains on the same tissue, suggesting that there is no defined limit to the number of antigens that can be immunostained for reconstruction, as long as the sections remain intact and the previous antibody has been successfully eluted. BMMA resin embedding also preserved fluorescence of transgenic proteins. We propose that ICT may provide valuable high resolution, three-dimensional biological maps of multiple biomolecules within a single tissue or organ to better characterise and quantify tissue structure and function.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere53245
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

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