A human stem cell resource to decipher the biochemical and cellular basis of neurodevelopmental defects in Lowe syndrome

Bilal M. Akhtar, Priyanka Bhatia, Shubhra Acharya, Sanjeev Sharma, Yojet Sharma, Aswathy Bhuvanendran Nair Suseela Devi, Kavina Ganapathy, Anil Vasudevan, Padinjat Raghu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Human brain development is a complex process where multiple cellular and developmental events are coordinated to generate normal structure and function. Alteration in any of these events can impact brain development, manifesting clinically as neurodevelopmental disorders. Human genetic disorders of lipid metabolism often present with features of altered brain function. Lowe syndrome (LS) is an X-linked recessive disease with features of altered brain function. LS results from mutations in OCRL1, which encodes a phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase enzyme. However, the cellular mechanisms by which loss of OCRL1 leads to brain defects remain unknown. Human brain development involves several cellular and developmental features not conserved in other species and understanding such mechanisms remains a challenge. Rodent models of LS have been generated but failed to recapitulate features of the human disease. Here we describe the generation of human stem cell lines from LS patients. Further, we present biochemical characterization of lipid metabolism in patient cell lines and demonstrate their use as a 'disease-in-a-dish' model for understanding the mechanism by which loss of OCRL1 leads to altered cellular and physiological brain development.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbio059066
JournalBiology Open
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 5)P2
  • hiPSC-stem cells
  • Human disease
  • Lipid phosphatase
  • Lowe syndrome
  • Neural development
  • Phosphoinositides
  • PI(4

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